The Signal

Format: 2014-07-14

  If we’re honest with ourselves, we can all probably remember back to a childhood instance when we felt insufferably bored by a grade-school history textbook.  It wasn’t the history that that was boring – it was reading about it in those dry pages peppered with long-ago dates and unfamiliar names.  Well, guess what?  The textbooks are still like that, and today’s kids are still bored.

0 Comment(s)
 

  You know that 1930 Grant Wood painting, American Gothic – the one where the stern-looking farmer with a pitchfork is standing next to his sour-faced daughter?

0 Comment(s)
 

  In a city of more than 225 neighborhoods, Baltimore’s Reservoir Hill is known for its historical importance and its architectural significance. A new book, Kelly Dale Terrill’s Reservoir Hill, explores the history of the area through photographs, historical documents, and personal stories of neighborhood residents past and present.

0 Comment(s)
 

  For twenty five years, The Bach Concert Series has been showcasing the works of JS Bach in monthly performances at Christ Lutheran Church in Baltimore’s Inner Harbor.  Signal contributor Jeff Trueman has recently discovered the magic of the series, and he brings us this tale of appreciation.

 

0 Comment(s)
 

  Nancy Heneson joins the program with “Immortal,” the story of a soul (temporarily) without a body.

 

0 Comment(s)
 

  So, if we were to draw a Venn Diagram with ‘public radio listeners’ in one circle and ‘death metal fans’ in the other circle, we’re not quite sure what the overlap would be.  Maybe the results would surprise us.

0 Comment(s)
 

  On May 2nd, the 2013 Mary Sawyers Baker Prizes were announced, and three Baltimore artists suddenly found themselves each 25 thousand dollars richer.

0 Comment(s)
 

  Jen Michalski’s sweeping new novel, The Tide King, takes readers from 19th Century Poland through World War II Europe and, from there, across the US.  It’s a tale infused with magical realism:  Stanley Polensky and Calvin Johnson are fellow American soldiers during the war. One will end up near death.  The other will save his life by feeding him a mystical herb.

0 Comment(s)
 

  Think your workplace is stressful?  It might be worth remembering that it could be much worse.

0 Comment(s)
 

  He was a beloved bartender, an unlikely hot sauce entrepreneur, a cancer survivor, and a retired stuntman.  When Mick Kipp, better known as “Mick the Pirate,” died from cardiac arrest on Sunday, April 28th, Baltimore lost a kind soul and a larger-than-life personality.

0 Comment(s)