Radio Kitchen

Format: 2014-04-24

In keeping with our mission on our show to bring you up to date information on the newest foods out there, we frequently ask our Food Scout, Adam Borden to be on the show.  This week Adam is reporting on two trends he has spotted: one tart and one sweet.
       

0 Comment(s)
 

Most of the grains we eat are probably ground up into and make their way into our kitchen as bags of flour.  But many grains are eaten whole,
 most obviously rice.  Thanks to the explosion of interest in unusual products from around the world, we now have a wide variety of grains available to us, and this is a case where good health comes with good flavor.
  Here's a run down on some of the most interesting.

Bulgur wheat:  This is a milled and pre-cooked form of wheat that retains the nutritional goodness of whole-grained wheat.  Using 

0 Comment(s)
 

As the first produce of the Spring starts to move into our local markets, there are two items in particular that we might want to keep an eye out for.   The first, asparagus, is quite easy to find, but may never be better than during these first few weeks of Spring.  The second, morel mushrooms are more difficult to find, and their season is quite short.  But these uniquely flavored fungi and worth the effort.  Interestingly enough, asparagus and morels team up quite easily.  Jerry had a great recipe that calls for both.

Asparagus and Morels in a Cr

0 Comment(s)
 

The sun is officially starting its way south again, and Spring is here, much to our delight.  One of the most pleasant compensations for having made it through the winter is the return of fresh local produce to markets everywhere.  Al and Jerry invited their friend Lucy Snodgrass to be with them, to give us an update on the first wave of produce we'll be seeing in a week or two.

0 Comment(s)
 

As complicated a subject as food is, food law is even more so.  Countries around the world are very careful about how people label their food, and great bodies of regulation exist to make sure that there is no misrepresentation. The U.S. is no different.  We may not be as concerned with geographical integrity as much as the French and Italians are, but we do worry a lot about words like organic and anti-biotic free.

0 Comment(s)
 

We've often said that Baltimore is blessed with many, many talented home cooks, folks who don't do it for a living, but have a real gift for working in the kitchen.  A few weeks ago we attended a dinner party and I was really impressed by a pair of dishes made by a good friend.  At Chef JP of C&A, I want you to meet Mr. Peter Wilson, architect and home cook.

WHITE ASPARAGUS WITH TANGERINE HOLLANDAISE SAUCE
5-6 servings

1 lb.

0 Comment(s)
 

All cooks love learning about new ingredients, especially when it comes with some cooking ideas.  Those of us who like to put some fish on the table occasionally may find ourselves in something of a rut.  Tuna, salmon, mahi-mahi, haddock and rockfish are all wonderful, but as somebody once noted, there's a lot of other fish in the sea.  Jerry is glad to help us out of the rut by suggesting these new varieties.

1.

0 Comment(s)
 

One of the more interesting aspects of wintertime is that we start craving fruit. All the deprivations of cold gloomy weather sharpen our appetites for the fruit of a sunnier climate.  I can't get along without my tangerines, I buy more grapefruit now than I do in summer, and I start eyeing some of the more exotic fruits a little more closely.  Jerry came up with some nice ideas.

1.  Pomegranates:  the fleshy seeds are delicious, but a little hard to get at. Try peeling under water in a bowl.  The white stuff will float up and the seeds will sink.

0 Comment(s)
 

Even if Santa didn't bring you a crock pot this year, it's still nice to contemplate sitting down to a bowl of steaming soup this winter.  Making a soup is easy, but you should be prepared to invest some time in it to allow everything to come together in the pot. Here are three ideas for some great winter warmers.

 

0 Comment(s)