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Flags of Maryland


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Flags were first used on battle grounds, to help people figure out where they belonged.  And to a large part, that still holds true, according to retired assistant state archivist Greg Stiverson. "Whether it’s a fraternal flag you belong to, whether it’s a flagThe Maryland, American, and Baltimore flags on the MICA campus. Credit: Stephanie Hughes. for a state you belong to, whether it’s the United States flag, or the flag of any other nation, that 'where you belong concept still holds true.  We really should think about what flags stand for, because they all have a story to tell.”

We wanted to hear some of the stories of flags in Maryland--American flags, the Maryland state flag, Ravens flags, gay pride--everything.  And we want your help. Do you have a flag that’s particularly meaningful to you?  What is it, and when do you fly it? 

Let us know--we'll post that flag on our map, and we'll tell some of those stories on air over the next six months, leading up to Flag Day.  You can email us at mdmorning@wypr.org, or give us a call at 410-881-3162.

The first three bouts of flag stories can be heard below--you'll hear from Laurie Wendler, who flies the purple Ravens flag, Baltimore Eagle bartender Derick Rojas, who tells us about the leather and bear flags flown outside the bar, and Dickeyville resident Charleye Dyer, who hangs an MIA / POW flag in honor of her dad, who’s been missing in action since his plane went down in what is now Papua New Guinea, on November 2, 1943.  We also learn why the Eastern Shore town of Queenstown chose to create a flag.


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 E-mail: mdmorning@wypr.org

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