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Bringing Back Oysters To Chesapeake Bay

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Credit: whitepines / stock.xchng / Creative CommonsOctober 16, 2013

The Chesapeake Bay once teemed with oysters, along with eager oystermen ready to harvest them. Now, it’s estimated that the bay holds only 1-percent of the number of oysters it once did. Efforts to restore the ailing oyster population span decades.

Last week, Governor Martin O’Malley touted those efforts, announcing that the state and its partners had created a record 1.25 billion baby oysters to be placed into the bay this year: "We’re finally headed in the right direction and our continued commitment to renewing this iconic species, this vital species, has begun to bring about tangible and real evidence of progress."

The state’s annual report on the oyster population last year noted continued population growth and fewer deaths due to disease. But, there is still a long way to go in the restoration effort.

To find out just how far, Tom Hall talks with Donald Boesch, a Professor of Marine Science at the University of Maryland and President of the Center for Environmental Science there.

The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration has a lot more about oysters in the Bay. 



 

 E-mail: mdmorning@wypr.org

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